Sections

Respiratory Therapist Career Guide

Respiratory Therapist Career Ratings

Income

Career
Growth

Personal Growth

Contribution

Influence

Job Profiles

Real-Life Respiratory Therapist Job Profiles

Below is a list of links to anonymous job profiles of REAL PEOPLE who have filled out our survey and offered to share their insights with our users about their job in the Respiratory Therapist field.
IDJob TitleGenderAgeEarningsCity & StateDate
33750Respiratory TherapistFemale31 $38,000South point, OH01/01/2010
33031Registered Respiratory TherapistFemale54 $55,000Burlington, MA01/01/2010

Overview

Compassionate individuals with a knack for anatomy may find respiratory therapy a suitable career choice. These health care professionals work under other medical specialists to help prevent, diagnose, and treat conditions relating to the heart and lungs.

A respiratory therapist understands the physiology and pathology of cardiopulmonary disorders, such as asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, and COPD. They may also work with premature babies to help develop their lungs. This career requires an understanding of medical technology and patient assessment. Critical thinking is essential, as you would be evaluating patients and their environments, and math is important for calculating proper doses. Since you?ll be dealing directly with patients, this career requires excellent interpersonal skills

Respiratory therapists need at least an associate?s degree, but a bachelor?s degree is often preferred. Courses in anatomy, physiology, biology, and pharmacology are part of the curriculum. Licensing is also necessary, and the two types are Registered Respiratory Therapist and Certified Respiratory Therapist. Many schools offer training programs that allow you to gain practical experience.

Most respiratory therapists work in a hospital, but other environments include laboratories, clinics, nursing homes, physician offices, and even visiting the homes of patients. If you are more interested in the technological side of respiratory devices, you may opt to work for a medical device manufacturer.

If this field interests you, learn more from the real-world career profiles below. We interviewed professional respiratory therapists one-on-one to give you insight into the daily life in this field. You can learn about educational training, career paths, and more, while receiving advice.


We’re in the process of adding additional content to this Career Guide.  Please check back soon.