Truity – Enneagram Personality Test Review

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Truity’s Enneagram Personality tests is a 10 minute test that is based on the earlier work of Oscar Ichazo in the 1950’s and Claudio Naranjo in the 1970’s. Comprised of 105 questions, this personality test is designed to help us understand where we fit in the Enneagram personality system.

In this article, we will explore the theory behind the test. We will take a closer and more in-depth look at the test and I will add my opinion as to how I found it. Enjoy!

What is the Enneagram model?

The Enneagram model of personality includes nine different personality styles that describe how we conceptualize the world, manage our emotions, respond to both stressful and supportive situations and how we can self-develop. Each of these nine types has its own strengths, weaknesses and core traits. The Enneagram types are:

  • Type ones are principled, purposeful and self-controlled. They strive for perfection and have the belief that everything must be in order.
  • Type twos are caring, generous and people-pleasing. They seek to be liked by others and find great satisfaction in helping others and feeling like they belong.
  • Type threes are driven and success-oriented. They have a desire to achieve great things and want to be admired by others for their success.
  • Type fours are sensitive, expressive and temperamental. They believe that they are different from other people and as a result, they long for a deep connection that will make them feel whole and accepted.
  • Type fives are perceptive, innovative and independent. They are able to concentrate and focus on developing complex ideas and as a result, they can become detached, yet high-strung and intense.
  • Type sixes are engaging, responsible and committed. They are profusely preoccupied with security and often scan their immediate environment for danger.
  • Type sevens are fun-loving, spontaneous and versatile. They enjoy new experiences and tend to see the world in terms of all the exciting things it has to offer.
  • Type eights are powerful, dominating and self-confident. They see themselves as strong, powerful and able to protect others. However, they can come across as intimidating to others.
  • Type nines are receptive, agreeable and easygoing. They strive for peace and harmony and, as a result, are often very accepting of others around them.

The ‘wings’

Each of these nine core types has ‘wings’, which are the types on either side of them. For example, a type eight will have a seven and nine wing. These wings are an extension of their core type and will provide them with more detail about their own unique personality.

They represent the related personality styles in which we can transition to. In general, we are influenced by both wings but one is typically more dominant. This dominant wing acts as a ‘sidekick’ or ‘helper’ in achieving our goals. They help us to unlock the full potential of our multifaceted personality,

What did I think of the Enneagram Personality Test?

The Enneagram test took me around seven minutes to complete. You are asked to indicate how well each statement describes your personality, from ‘inaccurate’ to ‘accurate’. Statements include things such as “I am an unusual sort of person“, “it is important for me to be prepared for any emergency“or “I set ambitious goals for myself“.

Overall, I found the test really engaging and there were no questions where I thought “what are you on about?”. I managed to answer each question without too much deliberation and as a whole, I would say I enjoyed taking this test.

Free or Paid version?

Like most of Truity’s tests, the actual test is free to take. Once you’ve completed the test, you will get a short summary of your results. This summary starts with a diagram the visualizes how you scored on each type.  As someone who is quite visual, I really liked this!

 

 

 

After looking at this diagram, you then get a break down of how you match with each type. My only critique for this section is that type one is not at the top, but the rest of the types are displayed in numerical order… but maybe I am just being pedantic!

Lastly, on the free version, you then get to explore your ‘personality superpowers’. You will touch on what traits are your biggest assets, but in order to look at this in any great depth, you’ll need to upgrade.

Should I Upgrade?

I took the plunge and paid the $19 to upgrade and, wow, what a fantastic decision that was! The paid version gives you SO much more detail. It really did take me ages to read through it all. Just like in the free version, you begin with exploring how you matched to each of the nine types. This is displayed as a percentage, and then a small description of the type is offered.

Exploring your Type In-Depth

After looking briefly at each type, the paid report then gets down to the ‘nitty gritty’. You explore which type you related to the most in great detail. In my case, this was the Enneagram type three. You will look at the following things in a huge amount of depth:

  • Your core strengths
  • Challenges that personality type may face
  • Your core weaknesses
  • Some of your core beliefs
  • Your core desires
  • Core strengths

The paid report will also look at, based on your core type, how you may behave in relationships. It will take a look at what childhood factors influence your behavior and what kinds of emotions you may be more prone to feeling. Your ‘spectrum of health’ is also explored. This gives you useful tools to understanding how you behave when you’re stressed, when you’re doing ‘averagely’ and when you’re thriving!

The report also takes a brief look at how you may perform at work, mostly focusing on what you might specifically need in the workplace. This is perhaps a little lacking in detail, but there is a whole personality test for the Enneagram at work, called the ‘Enneagram Professional Edition’, so we’ll let them off!

Exploring your wings

Just when I thought I’d learnt enough about myself, the report carried on! I discovered the two wings and how they influence my personality. For example, my type two wing makes me more generous and empathetic, and my type four gives me creativity and authenticity.

Exploring areas for self-development

The report then navigates to begin looking at self-development. At this stage of the report, you are given tasks for self-development. You are also given a lists of task aimed to help you grow, and a number of mantras to live by.

The reports comes to a close by exploring out top three personality superpowers. In this section, you will look in great detail at what your biggest assets are. Finally, this extensive report ends by reflecting on your blind spots – these are the things that are likely to get in your way and interfere with what you want to achieve in life.

What did other customers think?

Don’t just take my word for it, check out these fantastic reviews from REAL paying customers.

I loved how in-depth the report was and that it talked about the positives of my type, but also some of the pitfalls and helped me to understand those things about myself that aren’t always fun to think about.
Another customer commented “I found the results to be right on the mark! Of who I am, who I want to be and a reality check for where I fall short. The results descriptions made me look hard at how others may perceive me. And, at the same time, gave me a better perception of how I view myself and where there is room for improvement in my interaction with others. Thank you!”

Conclusion and what next?

Overall, I was really impressed with Truity’s Enneagram Personality test. The free version is a great way to get some initial insight. However, I think that what you get for an extra $19 is totally worth it. The plethora of detail and knowledge in the paid report really allowed me to explore myself in ways that I hadn’t before.

If you’re jealous of the amount of self-discovering this report has allowed me to do, then don’t be – you can take the report yourself by visiting this site.

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